A Sense of Control

A Sense of Control


Control, this is something that we humans desire to have over our dogs. In many ways this makes perfect sense, not just because we are responsible and accountable for our companion dogs, but also because being in control gives us a feeling of security and trust. Having a sense of control over your own experiences and knowing what can be expected, is of high importance for your welfare. 

The more we feel in control (the feeling alone can already be enough), the more relaxed we become. When we humans are faced with unpredictable situations, stress automatically occurs and coping mechanisms arise. Of course individual preferences will remain, but most people have a need for routines, predictability, resulting in a sense of control over their own experiences.


Exactly the same can be said for dogs. It is a common myth that dogs would want to gain control over others (this is something that many humans may want, but that’s another story..). Dogs really just want control over their OWN experiences. Unpredictability and a lack of control can cause dogs stress and negative feelings such as fear and frustration, often resulting in behavior that causes problems for their human guardians.


A healthy and emotionally stable dog can be very tolerant and resilient. They will quickly recover from stressful situations, especially if these are short and when there is plenty of room to recover. However, if a dog has no sense of control over its own experiences whatsoever and it is constantly challenged, pressure can rise and recovery can become more and more slow and difficult. If this goes on for a long period of time, this can eventually result in chronic stress, threatening a dog’s emotional and biological welfare.


Many ‘problem’ behaviors are strongly influenced by stress and a lack of sense of control (i.e. imagine being on a short lead all the time, this can sometimes play a part). This is why a lot of dog professionals are preaching to give the dog more control. Now, this may cause some people to panic. “Offering a dog control?? Can my dog handle this? What about safety?”.


Don’t worry, you can offer a dog more control AND assure safety and guidance. It is not about letting the dog sort out everything by itself and just letting go of everything and just wait and see what happens. You do not have to cut loose all forms of control, this could even be detrimental and dangerous. Responsible and active guidance is always needed in order for dogs to survive safely in our busy human world. 

You can give your dog a sense of control. Just the feeling of being able to make some own choices and experiencing them, can already make dogs feel more relaxed and strongly increase their trust in the world.


Herewith 3 suggestions to increase your dog’s sense of control.


1: Offer a form of routines and predictability

Individual preferences will always be present, but most dogs like to know what to expect. Some dogs thrive if you decide to walk the same walk every day (though visual cues may remain the same, scent changes continuously), other dogs may get bored by this, so always adjust strategies to best fit your dog. Not everything has to be at set times (though some dogs will love this), but you can also think about the way that you present certain things and see if your dog prefers routine over unpredictability.


2: Offer your dog some choice now and then

In example, when showing affection to a dog, offer the dog the choice to move away or lean in for more by stopping the interaction for a couple of seconds. What does your dog choose?

Another example is letting your dog choose between toys or food and seeing what the dog prefers. 

Why not let the dog choose which way the walk is going and offering the dog the possibility to choose direction? Perhaps use a longer lead than the standard 1.80m (see what happens if you use a longer line, i.e. 3m to start with..)

Again, individual preferences may differ, but have a go, test and see what your dog enjoys most.


3: Structured interactions, welfare based training

Teaching your dog cues for behavior that results in rewards can give a dog an enormous boost of confidence AND a sense of control (for both the humans and the dogs involved, this is a win win situation). You can help your dog by showing the dog what behaviors will result in rewards and offer your dog the opportunity to score. Both of you will benefit greatly from this.



© LotsDogs | Written by Liselot Boersma, dog welfare & behavior consultant (PgDip CABW) and owner of LotsDogs, august 2017; translated in 2020. Copy paste of images or text is forbidden. Sharing the URL of this website is very much appreciated. Many thanks in advance.

Based in the Netherlands, Westbeemster 

Email: info@HondenLot.nl

© LotsDogs.

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Liselot Boersma

 

Dog Welfare & Behavior consultant

Cartoonist

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